USEUROPEAFRICAASIA 中文双语Français
China
Home / China / Education

Clapper talk, calligraphy changing bilingual education in Xinjiang

Xinhua | Updated: 2017-10-06 11:03

KASHGAR, Xinjiang - Batur Mamut was moved to tears while watching his daughter's "clapper talk" performance in fluent Putonghua (standard Chinese).

"I am just extremely happy to see my child speaking Putonghua so well," said the 51-year-old taxi driver from Shufu County in northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region.

Most villagers his age in Kashgar's remote rural areas only speak Uygur language, which has been a common barrier for those who seek jobs in eastern cities.

However, among the younger generation that situation is quickly changing, as children are becoming bilingual from as early as kindergarten age.

Batur Mamut's daughter Nursebi Batur is a fourth grader at the central primary school in Tokkuzak Township.

The story she performed in clapper talk, a traditional Chinese form of narrative singing accompanied by a pair of clappers, was about the changes that have taken place in the school since 2014.

In April 2014, Chinese President Xi Jinping visited the school and told teachers that it is important to facilitate bilingual education for children from China's ethnic minority groups.

If they can master standard Chinese, it will be easier for them to find jobs, and more importantly, contribute to national unity, according to Xi.

Following the president's instruction, the school and education authorities have taken many steps to boost the children's bilingual abilities.

More and more courses are being taught by bilingual teachers and new styles of learning are being explored, including clapper talk, which requires performers use bamboo clappers to mark the beats.

Previous 1 2 Next

Editor's picks
BACK TO THE TOP
Copyright 1995 - . All rights reserved. The content (including but not limited to text, photo, multimedia information, etc) published in this site belongs to China Daily Information Co (CDIC). Without written authorization from CDIC, such content shall not be republished or used in any form. Note: Browsers with 1024*768 or higher resolution are suggested for this site.
License for publishing multimedia online 0108263

Registration Number: 130349
FOLLOW US