China's first offshore wind power generator ready

Updated: 2007-11-29 06:46

BEIJING -- China's first offshore wind power station, located in Liaodong Bay in the northeast Bohai Sea, was officially put into operation on Wednesday.

The wind power station was built by the China National Offshore Oil Corp (CNOOC), the country's largest offshore oil producer, with an investment of 40 million yuan ($5.4 million).

It kicked off trial operation on November 8, and has generated 200,000 kilowatt-hours of electricity by November 26.

The generating unit was fixed to a jacket structure of the CNOOC's Suizhong 36-1 oil field, which is 70 kilometers offshore in the Bohai Sea, with a five-meter-long submarine cable linking the unit with the central platform of the oil filed for power supply.

"This is the first wind power station in the world designed for power supply of offshore oil and gas fields," said Zhou Shouwei, CNOOC's deputy general manager.

The unit is expected to reach an annual output of 4.4 million kilowatt-hours, which is equal to saving 1,100 tons of diesel oil annually and also the reduction of 3,500 tons of carbon dioxide and 11 tons of sulfur dioxide, according to Zhou.

The Chinese government has been promoting the use of renewable energy, including wind power and solar power, amid efforts to shift from heavy reliance on coal consumption.

China's installed capacities of wind power reached 2.3 million kilowatt-hours in 2006, and is expected to hit 5 million by the end of 2007.

The country's installed capacities of wind power are set to reach 30 million kilowatt-hours by 2020, according to the government plan.

China's offshore wind power capacities are almost three times that of onshore capacities, said Wang Jingquan, an academician with the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

Top China News  
Today's Top News  
Most Commented/Read Stories in 48 Hours