Home>News Center>World
         
 

US democrats force delay of Bolton final vote
(Agencies)
Updated: 2005-05-27 08:30

US democrats forced the Senate to put off a final vote Thursday on John R. Bolton's nomination to be U.N. ambassador, the latest setback for the tough-talking nominee President Bush has called strong medicine for corruption and inefficiency at the United Nations.

Democrats contended the White House had stiff-armed the Senate over classified information on Bolton's tenure in his current job as the State Department's arms control chief, and demanded more information before the Senate can give Bolton an up-or-down vote.

Sen. Joseph Biden, D-Del. speaks to the media at the Capitol, Thursday, May 26, 2005, in Washington. Democrats forced the Senate to put off a final vote Thursday on John R. Bolton's nomination to be U.N. ambassador, the latest setback for the tough-talking nominee President Bush has called strong medicine for corruption and inefficiency at the United Nations. (AP
Sen. Joseph Biden, D-Del. speaks to the media at the Capitol, Thursday, May 26, 2005, in Washington. Democrats forced the Senate to put off a final vote Thursday on John R. Bolton's nomination to be U.N. ambassador, the latest setback for the tough-talking nominee President Bush has called strong medicine for corruption and inefficiency at the United Nations.[AP]
Republicans needed 60 votes to end the Democrats' procedural delays and move to an immediate final vote on Bolton's confirmation. But the vote to halt the stalling was 56-42, four shy of that threshold. The final Bolton vote will not take place until at least June, after the Senate returns from a Memorial Day recess.

The dramatic roll call underscored that, despite the compromise the two parties' centrists forged just days ago in a bitter dispute over judicial nominees, most senators still had a taste for partisan confrontation over a polarizing figure like Bolton.

It also raised questions about Bush's ability to win confirmation of some of his more ideological appointees as he begins his second term in the White House. And it was a setback for Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist, R-Tenn., who was hoping to end nearly three months of delays and investigation and finally deliver Bolton's nomination for the president.

Frist said the Bolton matter soured the air of cooperation.

The US Senate deferred until June a confirmation vote on the nomination of John Bolton, seen here April 2005, to become US ambassador to the United Nations, bowing to the wishes of Democrats pressing for additional documents on the hawkish administration official(AFP/File
The US Senate deferred until June a confirmation vote on the nomination of John Bolton, seen here April 2005, to become US ambassador to the United Nations, bowing to the wishes of Democrats pressing for additional documents on the hawkish administration official. [AFP/File]
"John Bolton, the very first issue we turned to, we got what looks to me like a filibuster," Frist said. "It certainly sounds like a filibuster ... it quacks like a filibuster."

Sen. Joseph Biden, D-Del., said Democrats do not want to postpone an up-or-down vote indefinitely.

"We are willing to vote 10 minutes after we get back in session, if in fact they provide the information," Biden said.

Thursday's vote lasted about 50 minutes far longer than the 15 minutes generally allowed for roll calls as GOP leaders futilely hunted for enough support to prevail.

In a telephone interview, White House spokesman Scott McClellan said the administration was pleased that Republicans would revisit the vote after the recess and criticized Democrats for the newest delay.

"Just 72 hours after all the goodwill and bipartisanship, it is a shame to see the Democratic Senate leadership resort back to such a partisan approach," McClellan said. "This is a nominee that enjoys majority support."

Sens. Mark Pryor of Arkansas, Ben Nelson of Nebraska and Mary Landrieu of Louisiana were the only Democrats to vote for going to a final vote on Bolton. Frist was the only Republican to vote against ending the delays, but he only did so because that gave him the procedural right to force the Senate to vote again on the issue.

Sens. Daniel Inouye, D-Hawaii, and Arlen Specter, R-Pa., did not vote.



 
  Today's Top News     Top World News
 

Battles won on drugs, but war rages on

 

   
 

China wants Games torch on Mt.Qomolangma

 

   
 

Shanghai targeting at property bubbles

 

   
 

FM: Talks only way to East China Sea row

 

   
 

Focus on security, airlines instructed

 

   
 

Nestle baby formula pulled off the shelves

 

   
  40,000 Iraqis to form shield in Baghdad
   
  US democrats force delay of Bolton final vote
   
  U.S. helicopter fired on in Iraq, crashes
   
  Iraqi government says Al-Zarqawi wounded
   
  World must race against time to save Darfur -Annan
   
  US House passes 491-billion defense bill with new money for Iraq war
   
 
  Go to Another Section  
 
 
  Story Tools  
   
  Related Stories  
   
US senate committee advances Bolton for U.N. post
   
US senate panel delays vote on Bolton to U.N.
   
59 American ex-diplomats oppose Bolton
  News Talk  
  Are the Republicans exploiting the memory of 9/11?  
Advertisement