2009 top ten news

Top 10 crackdowns 2009

(chinadaily.com.cn)
Updated: 2009-12-30 08:36
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Editor's note: Internet porn, drunk driving, human trafficking, someone wandering around the neighborhoods in pajamas...The Chinese government has good reason to keep itself busy all year long. Here are the year's top ten crackdowns, some are timely, some are belated and some are disputable, but all have had an impact on our daily lives. [The Top 10 Everything of 2009]

1. Chongqing triad

2. Online porn 

3. Drunk driving

4. Mobile porn

5. Soccer scandals

6. File-sharing websites

7. Human trafficking

8. Pajamas wearing in public

9. Celebrity endorsements

10. Phone scams

1. Chongqing triad

Top 10 crackdowns 2009
Police escort suspected gangsters into court before an organized crime trial in Chongqing Dec 1, 2009. [China Daily]

On the morning of October 16, Chongqing Party secretary Bo Xilai told the public for the first time about what set off the "anti-mobster" storm in Chongqing over the past year. He said: "We didn't strike out against mobsters on our own initiative, it was they who forced us to take steps."

The city started a massive crackdown on organized crime in June, exposing deep ties between police and criminals. A spokesman for the municipal procuratorate said at the time police had arrested 700 in connection with gang-related crimes in Chongqing in the year till November.

Related readings:
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 Gang leader executed in SW China
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 One-time policeman stands trial for leading gang
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 Police violated lawyer's rights: Group
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 Money-laundering gang trial opens in SW China
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 Appeal against death, jail term for gangsters rejected
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 Gang leader gets 20 years in jail in SW China
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 Gang boss goes on trial
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 Five sentenced to death in S China gang trial
 

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2. Online porn

Top 10 crackdowns 2009
Chinese youths play online games at an Internet cafe in Beijing in 2007. China has extended its crackdown on porn to online games after shutting down 1,250 websites containing explicit pornographic content. [Agencies]

China began a high-profile crackdown on Internet porn in January, targeting popular online portals and major search engines such as Google and Baidu.

The government temporarily shut down access to Google in June after reports that it was providing links to pornographic content.

In the same month, the government ordered all new personal computers produced or sold in China after July 1 to carry "Green Dam-Youth Escort," filtering software designed to block pornographic content. The software was declared "not compulsory" by the government in August after it aroused huge controversy, as Internet users complained of privacy invasion and blocking information.

Related readings:
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 3,500 suspects detained in crackdown on online porn
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 Online porn tip-offs surge as China offers cash rewards
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 China softens stance on Green Dam filter
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 Major Internet pornography syndicate dismantled
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 Many kids checking out online porn sites
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 Police crack down on porn sites with foreign proxies
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 Govt steps up heat on Google
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 New regulation restricts sex info on Internet

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3. Drunk driving

Top 10 crackdowns 2009
Sun Weiming,a driver convicted for causing a fatal car accident that killed four people last December, reacts after the court overturns his death penalty to life imprisonment. [Xinhua]

After a number of deadly road accidents caused by drunk driving, China launched a two-month "zero-tolerance" campaign on August 15.

Drunk drivers caught, had their licenses suspended for three or six months and, in serious cases, the driver detained for 15 days. If a drunk driver was caught twice within one year, his or her license was revoked for two to five years.

Here are some of the dreadful accidents caused by drink drivers this year: A motorist in Heilongjiang Province killed two people and injured 23 while driving under the influence of alcohol on August 5. A car careened out of control on a busy Nanjing street, killing five people, including a seven-month pregnant woman on June 30. On Aug 4, a drunk driver in Hangzhou killed a 16-year-old girl. Two days later, another drunk driver in Shanghai killed a four-year-old boy and injured three others.

Related readings:
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 Nation tightens crackdown on drunken driving
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 Drink driver gets life sentence for killing five
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 Drunk driver admits killing two in NE China
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 China reverses death penalty in drunk driving case
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 Police catch 6,094 drunk drivers in 2 days
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 Drunk driving claims 97 lives in Beijing in H1
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 Drunks don't cause accidents; they kill people

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4. Mobile porn

Top 10 crackdowns 2009

China had just got Internet porn under control, and then the country had to deal with WAP porn sites.

On Dec 8, nine government departments, including the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, General Administration of Press and Publication, and State Council Information Office launched a crackdown on cell phone porn. The campaign will continue until May.

Related readings:
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 WAP phones present challenge in war on porn
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 China targets porn on WAP websites
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 China Mobile moves to fight porn criticism
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 Father takes on rising cell porn

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5. Soccer scandals

Top 10 crackdowns 2009

In this undated photo, fans of Chinese Super League (CSL) club Shenzhen raise a banner (center) reading "Chinese Pig Association" during a match as a way to attack the Chinese Football Association (CFA). [file/China Daily] 

After World Cup failure in 2002, Chinese football was supposed to disappear from the public eye. However, it returned for all the wrong reasons. The recent exposure of illegal gambling and match-fixing in China's top professional football league shocked tens of millions of fans.

The Ministry of Public Security announced in November that a number of former players, soccer officials and club officials had been detained for match-fixing and gambling in Chinese soccer.

"China's football is critically ill. The roots must be pulled up along with the grass," quoted Xinhua News Agency in a report.

Related readings:
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 Soccer betting targeted in China
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 Match-fixing comes to light in nationwide crackdown
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 Police detain at least 4 in soccer gambling
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 China soccer match-fixing probe nets 3 execs
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 Former club official: Bribery rampant in leagues
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 Interpol-wanted former player proves linchpin in match-fixing
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 CFA staff probed for soccer scandals

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6. File-sharing websites

 
 
Top 10 crackdowns 2009
 
Movie fans were left stunned when they visited popular websites that offer free entertainment downloads only to find they had been closed down by regulators after China ramped up its battle against copyright infringement.

The move left millions of Chinese users disappointed after they checked out their favorite BitTorrent (BT) websites.

As long as websites don't resolve copyright problems, they won't be allowed to reopen, said an official with the online video and audio program department under the State Administration of Radio, Film and Television.

Related readings:
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 BitTorrent sites down but not out
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 More downloading websites going down
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 BT sites inaccessible, netizens distressed

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7. Human trafficking

Top 10 crackdowns 2009

 Police of Shanye county in Shandong province feed an infant who was rescued from kidnappers earlier in December. Efforts are being made to reduce cross-border human trafficking. [China Daily]

China has been faced with more organized and more professional cross-border human trafficking crimes in recent years. Child trafficking within China has penetrated almost all provinces.

In the six-month special anti-trafficking operation this year leading up to mid-October, Chinese police cracked 1,717 cases, rescuing more than 6,000 women and children.

Related readings:
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 China joins UN fight against human trafficking
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 Smashing the snakeheads
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 Children without a way home
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 Kids abducted, parents march on the street
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 Parents of missing children accuse govt of negligence
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 Crackdown follows rise in people smuggling

 

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8. Pajamas wearing in public

Top 10 crackdowns 2009

Nowhere else in China will you find residents wandering around their neighborhoods in distinctive pajamas as in Shanghai. The local government launched a controversial city-wide campaign to stop local residents from wearing their pajamas in public.

The "No Pajamas in Public Be Civilized" campaign is part of its efforts to present Shanghai as "an international metropolis" and show a "civilized" face of the city to foreign visitors, when it hosts the World Expo next May.

Related readings:
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 In defense of pajamas
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 What's wrong with a person in pajamas?
  

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9. Celebrity endorsements

Top 10 crackdowns 2009

Hou Yaohua promotes shampoo in a TV show. [File] 

In China, it is quite common to find celebrities acting in misleading commercials and bragging about the magic effects of certain products.

Following a series of scandals involving products that have killed or poisoned consumers, China's new food safety law, which came into effect on June 1, stipulates that celebrities should be held responsible for the substandard food products they promote in commercials.

But there is no law regulating liabilities in other products, including medicines.

Related readings:
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 CCTV host says sorry for fake ads
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 Crosstalk star 'faked' illnesses in commericals
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 Celebrity row is 'aiding food safety'
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 Official: False food endorsement may leave stars bankrupt

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10. Phone scams

Top 10 crackdowns 2009

 [chinaeconomicreview.com]

The public security ministry launched a four-month campaign starting June 12 after fraud cases through phone calls and text messages increased in recent years across the country.

Criminals often hook their victims by claiming to be from banks or the police, tricking victims into calling fake numbers and giving their account details. The thieves will also cheat the victims by telling them they have won prizes or even fake the kidnapping of a family members.

Related readings:
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 Phone fraud to rise as year ends
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 Mainland police nab 10 Taiwan suspects for swindling
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 Police cooperate to disconnect phone frauds
Top 10 crackdowns 2009 Beijing nets 601 suspects over phone scam

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