USEUROPEAFRICAASIA 中文双语Français
Opinion
Home / Opinion / Editorials

US act would put it at risk of being pawn of secessionists: China Daily editorial

chinadaily.com.cn | Updated: 2018-02-12 19:51

The Taiwan Travel Act, which encourages high-level exchange of visits between the United States and the island, passed the US Senate Committee on Foreign Relations last week as expected, and will now move to the Senate, where it is quite likely to get the seal of approval before being sent to the president to be signed into law.

But this is not a common bill. By pushing for official exchanges with Taiwan, the bill, if made into law, would signify a major shift in the US’ long-held one-China policy, which is the cornerstone of Sino-US relations.

It would also embolden Taiwan secessionists as it implies that the island is already achieving the kind of statehood that they pursue.

Giving credence to their ambitions would cross the red line set by the mainland in its Anti-Secession Law, which requires Beijing to employ non-peaceful means to protect China’s sovereignty and territorial integrity should those seeking “Taiwan independence” act by any means to cause the fact of Taiwan’s secession from China.

It thus promises to set China and the US on a direct collision course given that based on the Taiwan Relations Act — itself an example of US double-dealing in handling relations with China — Washington is obliged to assist Taiwan in its defense.

Despite this, it seems US politicians have an irresistible urge to set in motion a train of events that would inevitably lead to such a cataclysmic outcome somewhere down the line.

The move is the result of the general atmosphere in the US, which is increasingly hostile toward China, as evidenced by the US National Security Strategy that singles out China as a rival power, and President Donald Trump’s recent State of the Union address in which he placed China alongside “rogue regimes” and terrorist groups as a “horrible danger” challenging the US’ interests, economy and values.

Since it is clear that his administration is looking for ways to put China at a disadvantage, there is a real possibility the act will be signed into law. However, history shows such seemingly firm designs all too often run astray and contrary to their intended effects. Especially in such instances, when the tail can so easily wag the dog. Trump should bear that in mind if the bill is put on his desk for him to sign.

On issues such as Taiwan that concern China’s core national interests, the Chinese government has no room to make any compromise, even if that means the country has to go to war.

The Taiwan Travel Act, which encourages high-level exchange of visits between the United States and the island, passed the US Senate Committee on Foreign Relations last week as expected, and will now move to the Senate, where it is quite likely to get the seal of approval before being sent to the president to be signed into law.

But this is not a common bill. By pushing for official exchanges with Taiwan, the bill, if made into law, would signify a major shift in the US’ long-held one-China policy, which is the cornerstone of Sino-US relations.

It would also embolden Taiwan secessionists as it implies that the island is already achieving the kind of statehood that they pursue.

Giving credence to their ambitions would cross the red line set by the mainland in its Anti-Secession Law, which requires Beijing to employ non-peaceful means to protect China’s sovereignty and territorial integrity should those seeking “Taiwan independence” act by any means to cause the fact of Taiwan’s secession from China.

It thus promises to set China and the US on a direct collision course given that based on the Taiwan Relations Act — itself an example of US double-dealing in handling relations with China — Washington is obliged to assist Taiwan in its defense.

Despite this, it seems US politicians have an irresistible urge to set in motion a train of events that would inevitably lead to such a cataclysmic outcome somewhere down the line.

The move is the result of the general atmosphere in the US, which is increasingly hostile toward China, as evidenced by the US National Security Strategy that singles out China as a rival power, and President Donald Trump’s recent State of the Union address in which he placed China alongside “rogue regimes” and terrorist groups as a “horrible danger” challenging the US’ interests, economy and values.

Since it is clear that his administration is looking for ways to put China at a disadvantage, there is a real possibility the act will be signed into law. However, history shows such seemingly firm designs all too often run astray and contrary to their intended effects. Especially in such instances, when the tail can so easily wag the dog. Trump should bear that in mind if the bill is put on his desk for him to sign.

On issues such as Taiwan that concern China’s core national interests, the Chinese government has no room to make any compromise, even if that means the country has to go to war.

  
Most Viewed in 24 Hours
Top
BACK TO THE TOP
Copyright 1995 - . All rights reserved. The content (including but not limited to text, photo, multimedia information, etc) published in this site belongs to China Daily Information Co (CDIC). Without written authorization from CDIC, such content shall not be republished or used in any form. Note: Browsers with 1024*768 or higher resolution are suggested for this site.
License for publishing multimedia online 0108263

Registration Number: 130349
FOLLOW US